1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Come and join our girl community by registering for free and start discussing about girl topics, fashion, relationships...

The World Unites For Needy

Discussion in 'Girlie Gossip' started by Snowbaby, Jul 3, 2005.

  1. Snowbaby

    Snowbaby Active Member

    WORLD leaders aren't normally known for their great taste in music.

    But if nothing else, when the G8 summit begins in Edinburgh on Wednesday, the most powerful men in the world now know the unglamorous issue of African debt and poverty is well and truly on the agenda because of some scruffy pop stars.

    While not having quite the seismic impact as the original Live Aid 20 years ago, the Live8 concerts at the weekend still packed a political wallop.

    More than 26 million people sent text messages of support (a world record for a single event) and millions more either watched it live or on TV.

    "For God's sake, take this seriously. Don't behave normally. Don't look for compromises. Be great," Live8 organisers said yesterday in a joint statement after the concerts ended.

    In Edinburgh, 200,000 people marched peacefully through the city to back the Make Poverty History campaign.

    The media in Britain -- where the build-up to Live8 had a much higher profile -- hailed organiser Bob Geldof and the 170 pop acts who graced stages.

    "A beautiful day," read the front-page headline in The Independent on Sunday. "Is that loud enough for you?" asked The Sunday Times. But others are more sceptical.

    In Philadelphia, where hundreds of thousands crammed the streets to hear Will Smith and Stevie Wonder, singer Alicia Keys questioned America's interest in helping Africa.

    "America has a sense of disconnect when it comes to Africa or places that are very far away because many of us, most of us, won't get the opportunity to see those places," she said.

    Limited television coverage in the US could also dampen the impact of such an impressive show of people power.

    London's Hyde Park had the strongest line-up, with Paul McCartney, Bono, Madonna, Elton John, Pink Floyd, The Who and George Michael entertaining 200,000 people.

    WORLD leaders aren't normally known for their great taste in music.

    But if nothing else, when the G8 summit begins in Edinburgh on Wednesday, the most powerful men in the world now know the unglamorous issue of African debt and poverty is well and truly on the agenda because of some scruffy pop stars.

    While not having quite the seismic impact as the original Live Aid 20 years ago, the Live8 concerts at the weekend still packed a political wallop.

    More than 26 million people sent text messages of support (a world record for a single event) and millions more either watched it live or on TV.

    "For God's sake, take this seriously. Don't behave normally. Don't look for compromises. Be great," Live8 organisers said yesterday in a joint statement after the concerts ended.

    In Edinburgh, 200,000 people marched peacefully through the city to back the Make Poverty History campaign.

    The media in Britain -- where the build-up to Live8 had a much higher profile -- hailed organiser Bob Geldof and the 170 pop acts who graced stages.

    "A beautiful day," read the front-page headline in The Independent on Sunday. "Is that loud enough for you?" asked The Sunday Times. But others are more sceptical.

    In Philadelphia, where hundreds of thousands crammed the streets to hear Will Smith and Stevie Wonder, singer Alicia Keys questioned America's interest in helping Africa.

    "America has a sense of disconnect when it comes to Africa or places that are very far away because many of us, most of us, won't get the opportunity to see those places," she said.

    Limited television coverage in the US could also dampen the impact of such an impressive show of people power.

    London's Hyde Park had the strongest line-up, with Paul McCartney, Bono, Madonna, Elton John, Pink Floyd, The Who and George Michael entertaining 200,000 people.

    ource
     
Loading...

Share This Page