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Scholarships versus Being a Working Student

Discussion in 'School and college' started by digitalbrew, May 15, 2012.

  1. digitalbrew

    digitalbrew Member

    With the recession, it's a lot harder to go to school and earn a degree at the same time feed one's self. I have a friend who was so dedicated in schooling that she had 2 government scholarships and 1 private scholarship. Two of them paid for her school, while the other went to her personal expenses.

    I know in other countries, scholarships are only awarded to the very smart/talented/gifted ones. Here where I live, there are scholarships that only require you to pass a series of tests. And the ones with the highest averages would end up getting the grant.

    Who paid for you schooling? Did you have a scholarship or did you pay through school by being a working student?

    If your parents paid for your schooling, please don't forget to thank them. Seeing as I am earning for myself, it is quite hard. What more if I had to save up for my child's future.
     
  2. UmiNoor

    UmiNoor Member

    In my country, once you are given one scholarship, you're not eligible to apply for another. Wow, your friend is so lucky to have three scholarships all at once. My daughter is in college now and we're paying her fees through a government student loan which hardly pays for her whole education. We had to come up with the money first for registration and the fees for the first and second semester. The loan only covers about 65% of her fees.

    This is only my second daughter who's studying in college. My third daughter is going to college in 2014 and I hope my second daughter will help me with her fees.
     
  3. Parker

    Parker Member

    For the first two years of college, I had grants and college work study. Also, my parents paid a small portion. Then, I transferred to another college and I paid my way through college. I went to school full time and worked full time. I really don't recommend going that route. I seriously burned myself out.
     
  4. zararina

    zararina Member

    I had scholarship when I was in college and it is for three years. I am a full time student before die to my scholarship and I work for one year to finish my fourth year in college. It was not that easy since grades should be well maintained in order to meet the minimum average requirement.
     
  5. Lee11

    Lee11 Active Member

    I got through university through a combination of scholarships and student loans, for the first few years while studying I also worked part-time. When I did my honors, I worked full time and studied full time. You do what you need to do. You also appreciate what you earn so much more.
     
  6. digitalbrew

    digitalbrew Member

    Student loans? I'm not sure we have those in our country. I'm just curious, where your student is currently staying Miss Uminoor? We also have full scholarship grants in our school when you're a valedictorian in your previous school and if you keep being in a dean's list. I had one private and one public scholarship. I was able to finish my 5 year course because of it. I am quite thankful of this.

    I applaud people who work hard in order to finish their schooling. It's always great to hear stories of them, too.
     
  7. razelia

    razelia Member

    In my country as well, you can only apply for one type of scholarship, though that's I think on a school basis (i.e. you can have the school scholarship, and at the same time maybe get one from a foundation or something. But you can only have ONE type of school scholarship, as the schools offer different types).

    I've been a scholar since college up until now in Medical school. The type of scholarship I have is the one where you take an exam and have a maintaining grade, but they also offer one for those who are financially needy (they also have a maintaining grade, but it's quite lower compared to ours). It's been a really big help so far. My pre-med had acceptable fees ($1700 a year), but Medical school is a whole other thing on its own ($5200 a year).
     
  8. Lucky120

    Lucky120 Member

    Yes it all depends really. I mean some of us can work and some cannot. I have Financial Aid assistane and taking out laons at the moment since I am a mom at home. I cannot really get up and work at the moment at all. I would love to and I am trying to find a job, but being a military spouse and all of that it can get kind of crazy sometimes. I hope that many try and work or do something especially since the economy is bad. I have to say at least get an education.
     
  9. jenb128

    jenb128 Member

    When I went the first time, my parents paid some and I paid some by working part-time. I went back to college when I lost my job, and so far, I've been paying for it with savings. That's going to run out soon, so I may have to go the student loan route. I've been trying to find a part-time job, but so far, nobody has been willing to work around my class schedule. They all want people with "open availability." (Or maybe they're just using that as an excuse when they decide I'm "not the right fit"). Fortunately, my husband has a decent job, but it doesn't pay enough to support us both AND pay for my tuition.
     
  10. j_pin

    j_pin Member

    I worked two jobs in college, had some government aid and still ended up about 60k in student loan debt. It's not fun, even with a decent job the monthly payment is pretty high!
     
  11. feminista

    feminista Member

    Try and go for scholarships if you can! This isn't always easy, however. Scholarships (especially in-course, and for a mix of academic and extracurricular achievement) will push you to take on more leadership activity and be more involved with student life. They'll also look better on an application when you look for higher-level jobs, grad school, or professional school later. While I do admire people who are able to balance a job with going to school (it is tough), in the end running a conference will mean more than being a barista following graduation. If you have to work, best of luck to you-- the system is unfair, and tuition should be lower. Do everything you can do to graduate without debt, because it'll allow you more latitude in deciding your future.
     
  12. Quirky Jessi

    Quirky Jessi Member

    I had scholarships.

    I had grants.

    I had financial aid.

    I had two jobs.

    And I still ended up with school loans, too....
     
  13. feminista

    feminista Member

    Wow Quirky Jessi, that's super unfortunate. Man, I really think tuition needs to be lowered. It's not even like Jess is the only person who's had to face this situation, it's more common than you think. Worst.
     
  14. FlanneryCam

    FlanneryCam New Member

    I pretty much ended up in the same boat as Quirky Jessi. I was lucky enough to get grants, scholarships and financial aid. These things helped enormously! I wouldn't have been able to graduate from my first degree debt free without all this support. I guess I was also lucky to have parents who could financially help me out too.

    But when I went back to school for my MA, even with tons of scholarships, stipends and grants I ended up in the hole.

    I've worked since I was 16. There was something really important about learning how to hold down a job and manage to get school work done. I needed the money, but I also needed the training. Thanks to working through school, I have an awesome work ethic and I'm a multi-tasking superhero.
     
  15. kiwigirl

    kiwigirl Member

    I was granted a scholarship for winning an Economics competition and my dad has helped pay the rest. I'm fortunate not to have any student loans. In saying this I did work at a part time job during my senior year of high school and I've worked through college to save money for my future and get work experience. Also university is cheaper in New Zealand than many countries as it's highly subsidized by the government.
     
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