1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Come and join our girl community by registering for free and start discussing about girl topics, fashion, relationships...

C . . . . . Cranberry

Discussion in 'Ailments & Natural Remedies' started by Snowbaby, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. Snowbaby

    Snowbaby Active Member

    The medicinal properties of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) have been recognized for centuries.

    Native Americans used raw cranberries as a wound dressing. Early settlers from England learned to use the berry both raw and cooked for a number of ailments including appetite loss, digestive problems, blood disorders, and scurvy (vitamin C deficiency that causes weakness, gum disease, and spontaneous bleeding in the skin).

    In the early 1920s, American scientists discovered that people who eat large amounts of cranberries have more acid in their urine than those who do not eat high amounts of the berry. Because bacteria cannot survive in an acidic environment, the researchers speculated that a diet rich in cranberries may help prevent and treat urinary tract infections (UTIs), which are commonly caused by bacteria known as Escherichia coli.

    The ripe fruit of the cranberry is the part used in commercial and medicinal preparations.

    Source
     

Share This Page